FOOD SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY

Food Science and Technology

PHILOSOPHY

Food Science and Technology is a field of integrated study of basic sciences, Microbiology, Biochemistry, Nutrition, Biotechnology, Engineering Technology for the development and management of food resources. The discipline exposes the nature, composition and properties of food materials and their behaviour during processing, handling, storage, distribution and utilization.

OBJECTIVES

The Food Science and Technology programme is designed to provide a practical and theoretical training on:
The conversion of raw agricultural produce into processed, packaged, shelf stable food products and intermediate industrial raw materials.
Different aspects of food preservation.
Establishment, maintenance and assurance of food quality.
Design and maintenance of food process machineries.
Direct practical experience in food industries, food research laboratories/station and governmental agencies responsible for the formulation and enforcement of food laws.
Entrepreneurial skills that will make students self-reliant/employed on graduation.

Admission Requirements:

Prospective first degree candidates must satisfy both the university minimum entry and specific departmental requirements. The Department specifically requires that:
The 5-year B.Sc. (UME) programme candidates must have obtained credits in five (5) subjects at two sittings in the Senior School Certificate Examination or equivalent. The subjects include:
English Language
Chemistry
Mathematics
Physics
Biology (Botany or Zoology) or Agricultural Science
And any other Science subject
For UME examination subject combination, Physics can be substituted for Mathematics.
The 4-year (Direct entry) B.Sc. programme candidates must possess at principal level in the Higher School Certificate or equivalent passes in G.C.E. Advanced level in any two of the following subjects:
Chemistry
Biology (Botany or Zoology)
Agricultural Science
Physics
Mathematics
Candidates with Diplomas in relevant subjects may be offered admission by direct entry.
d. Programme/Sub-Discipline/Discipline Structure to include period of formal studies in the Universities industrial training, planned visit and projects
The programme lasts for 4 – 5 years depending on entry qualifications. In the normal 5-year programme, the first two years are devoted to strengthening the basic sciences and a good appreciation of the arts and the humanities; then follows the introduction to Food Science and Engineering from the 2nd and 3rd years, and finally come the main core courses in Food Science and Technology as shown in Fig. 2 below.
__________________
/ 3rd / 4th / 5th / Core Food Sci. & Tech.
/ 2nd / 3rd / Introduction to Food Sci. & Engineering
/ 1st / 2nd / Basic Sciences
/_________ 5 year Course __________/
Fig. 2: Sketch of the Nature of the Course in Food Science and Technology

The exposure of students is reinforced in the second semester of the 4th year by 6 months Industrial Attachment in the Food Industries and allied establishments to acquire industrial experience of real work situations. At the end of the industrial attachment, every student is expected to submit a report and present a seminar on his/her experience. In addition to the course work, each student in the final year undertakes a research project work that enables him/her to put into practice the theoretical and practical knowledge and skills for the purpose of carrying out specific investigation in chosen area of food science, technology and engineering and subsequently present a seminar and submit a project report.
Scope
Food Science and Technology attracts students with a wide and flexible outlook, those for whom the pure science, engineering and other applied sciences appear restrictive. The programme lasts for 4 & 5 years depending on entry qualification. In the normal 5-year programme, the first two years are devoted to strengthening the basic sciences and a good appreciation of the arts and the humanities; then follows the introduction to Food Science and Engineering in the 2nd and 3rd years, and finally the major courses in Food Science and Technology.
The exposure of the students is reinforced during the 2nd Semester of the 4th year by a 6-month industrial attachment to food industries, food research stations, laboratories and related agencies to acquire industrial experience of real work situation. At the end of the industrial attachment, each student submits a report and presents a seminar on his/her acquired experience. In the final year, each student also carries out a specific laboratory investigation or research in any area of food science and technology, presents a seminar on the research and submits a project report based on the research findings.
(c) Admission Requirements:
Prospective first degree candidates must satisfy both the university minimum entry and specific departmental requirements. The Department specifically requires that:
The 5-year B.Sc. (UME) programme candidates must have obtained credits in five (5) subjects at two sittings in the Senior School Certificate Examination or equivalent. The subjects include:
English Language
Chemistry
Mathematics
Physics
Biology (Botany or Zoology) or Agricultural Science
And any other Science subject.
For UME examination subject combination, Physics can be substituted for Mathematics.
The 4-year (Direct entry) B.Sc. programme candidates must possess at principal level in the Higher School Certificate or equivalent passes in GCE Advanced Level in any two of the following subjects:
Chemistry
Biology (Botany or Zoology)
Agricultural Science
Physics
Mathematics
Candidates with Diplomas in relevant subjects may be offered admission by direct entry.

Job Opportunities

A successful graduate of Food Science and Technology can embark on a teaching career in the University, Polytechnic or College of Technology, undertake advanced studies in any of a number of courses associated with Food Science, Food Engineering, Food Technology, or Nutritional Sciences, Biotechnology, Product Development, Extension Education, Food Microbiology, Food Laws and Regulations, Marketing and Management etc. Graduates are adequately trained to be employed at the senior level in food industries, regulatory agencies, food service, extension organizations and research institutes. Most importantly, food science and technology graduates are trained to be capable of establishing their own small and medium scale food enterprises.

GENERAL INFORMATION

Academic Atmosphere
The academic programme allows each student to present three (3) seminars. The first seminar is on the work experience gained during the six months SIWES in Food and related industries. The second is a proposal seminar on the student’s final year research project topic. During this seminar the student explains in detail the research project to undertake and the experimental methods to be used. The students are questioned and constructive corrections are made on both the project topics and methodology. The third seminar involves presentation and discussion of the results of their research findings. The students performance in these three seminars is evaluated by all academic staff.
Practical classes are conducted and the students are assessed on such practical works. Industrial visits and excursions to food and related industries are embarked on to augment the laboratory practical demonstrations. Effective evaluation of students performance is done through continuous assessments and final examinations which account for 30% and 70% respectively of the total mark for each course.

Students Welfare:

Each student is assigned to a staff adviser who advises the student on academic matters and to whom he/she I expected to lodge all his/her academic complain. The staff adviser also helps the student select and register courses for the semester/session. The staff adviser sees to the prompt and dispassionate settlement of any grievances the student may have. He however reports to the Head of Department (HOD) any problems that he cannot handle or that requires the HODs attention. Additionally the students are catered for in their hostels by the Dean of Student Affairs, through the Hall Wardens and Hall Officers.

Examinations

The students performances are evaluated based on examination and continuous assessments. Examinations are conducted at the end of each semester. University examination Time-Table is drawn by the Registry (Examination section) with the Departmental Examination Time-Tables from the various departments, about 1 month before the examination. About the same time, questions and marketing schemes are requested for by the Head of Department from all academic staff on all courses taught. These are moderated by the Departmental Board of Examiners. The question paper is finally produced by the Head of Department from the moderated questions, for courses up to the 400 level. Each lecturer is given a free hand to decide on the nature of assignment for continuous assessment which can be in form of test, term paper, practical or mini project.
For the final year students, the moderated questions are sent under strict confidentiality by the Head of Department to the External Examiner for final moderation Thereafter, the Head of Department keeps the questions until the moment of the examination. Early on the examination day, the questions are produced and sealed in envelopes in the Heads office under the strictest security. The sealed questions are handed over to the chief invigilator (normally a senior academic staff) just before the commencement of the examination.
Before the examination, the students are screened to ensure that no prepared material is taken into the examination hall by students. The University regulations governing examinations, which the students are aware of apply. After the examination, the answer scripts are first sent to the Head of Department who distributes them to the course lecturers for marking immediately.
After marking, the marked scripts and the marked sheets are returned to the Head of Department while the marks sheet is forwarded to the Examinations section of the Registry. For the final year students, scripts are kept for the last moderation by the External Examiner. The results of the final year students are classified o the cumulative grade point average by the Departmental Board and later by the Faculty Board that recommends the results to the Senate for approval.

Abstracts